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Employment Issues PDF Print E-mail
"Easing the ‘Rush Hour’ of Life - Diversity of Life Courses in International Comparison"

The Foundation for the Rights of Future Generations has been occupied with this topic during the year 2008. From 4-6 July 2008, a symposium took place in Berlin, Germany. It focused on possible ways to ease competing time demands of the so-called ‘rush hour’ of life between the ages of 28 and 38. During this period, people finish their apprenticeships or studies; they begin to work and have to decide whether or not to start a family. An underlying question is: “To what extent could people change the planning of their lives right from the start, if they took into account that their life expectancy is higher than that of previous cohorts?”
Read more... 

 

“Generation ‘P’ – The unequal treatment of the old and the young in the workplace”

"Generation P" can stand for "Precarious", or the German word for interns, "Praktikanten". The idea behind it remains the same whatever it stands for: it describes a generation that instead of getting fixed employment after studying is forced to complete a number of badly paid internships. Increasingly, interns are being exploited as cheap labour because they are not covered by the regulatory hand of the public authorities and are badly informed about their rights. They have minimal legal protection, and work long hours to try and prove themselves to possible future employers, but they can be fired with very little notice and for no given reason. A new precarious generation has emerged.

This issue is the topic of our Intergenerational Justice Award 2007/2008. Find out more here

Click here to read a presentation of our Scientific Director from the European Confederation of Independent Trade Unions' (CESI) May 2007, international symposium:  "Integrating Young and Older Employees into the Labour Market". The event was the second in the series of conferences entitled "Europe’s Demographic Challenge - Ways out of the Crisis".