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Newslet­ter for Inter­gen­er­a­tional Jus­tice – 12/2013

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1) Cam­paign: “We want to vote!”

2) Aca­d­e­m­ic Sym­po­sium: “Youth Quo­tas”, 25/26 Octo­ber 2013

3) The 7th Inter­gen­er­a­tional Jus­tice Award 2013/2014: “Youth Move­ments for Inter­gen­er­a­tional Jus­tice”

4) New Board Mem­ber at the FRFG: Bern­hard Win­kler

5) The new ambas­sadors of the FRFG

6) The 44th St. Gallen Sym­po­sium: “The Clash of Civ­i­liza­tions”

7) Report of the Oxford Mar­tin Com­mis­sion for Future Gen­er­a­tions

8) Future Gen­er­a­tions in the UN

9) Impor­tant Events for the FRFG

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1) Cam­paign: “We want to vote!”

01_12_13_wollenwaehlenAt the par­lia­men­tary elec­tions in 2013, chil­dren and youth had no voice. Mil­lions of peo­ple in Ger­many are exclud­ed from the elec­tions, just because they are under the age of 18. This vio­lates the con­sti­tu­tion­al laws on democ­ra­cy and sov­er­eign­ty of the peo­ple. This sit­u­a­tion is no longer defen­si­ble. There­fore, the FRFG has, togeth­er with chil­dren and youth, tak­en the ini­tia­tive to found the cam­paign “We want to vote!” . The main goal for the cam­paign is to con­test the par­lia­men­tary elec­tion.

You can sup­port our cam­paign! Please see our fund­ing request at betterplace.org for fur­ther infor­ma­tion.

The pol­i­cy paper “Elec­tions with­out age lim­its”, made by the FRFG can be found here .

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2) Aca­d­e­m­ic Sym­po­sium: “Youth Quo­tas”, 25/26. Octo­ber 2013

02_12_13_symposiumIn the last week­end of Octo­ber (25/26th), the Aca­d­e­m­ic Sym­po­sium “Youth Quo­tas – The Answer to Changes in Age Demo­graph­ics”, was arranged in Stuttgart by the FRFG and the Inter­gen­er­a­tional Foun­da­tion (IF)
A high num­ber of estab­lished as well as younger sci­en­tists pre­sent­ed their ideas to this high­ly under-researched top­ic. The week­end was char­ac­ter­ized by a pleas­ant atmos­phere. Sev­er­al pre­sen­ta­tions were giv­en, all of them at a high aca­d­e­m­ic lev­el.
At the sym­po­sium, the aca­d­e­m­ic papers regard­ing the 4th Demog­ra­phy Prize 2012/2013  were award­ed. The Stiftung Apfel­baum pro­vid­ed a prize mon­ey of 10 000 EUR for free dis­pos­al.

The com­plete pro­gram of the sym­po­sium can be found here.

The award­ed papers can be found here.

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3) The 7th Inter­gen­er­a­tional Jus­tice Award 2013/2014: “Youth Move­ments for Inter­gen­er­a­tional Jus­tice”

03_12_13_jugendbewegungenIn coop­er­a­tion with the IF, the FRFG here­by announces the 7th Inter­gen­er­a­tional Jus­tice Award 2013/2014 con­cern­ing the top­ic “Youth Move­ments for Inter­gen­er­a­tional Jus­tice”. The award is sup­port­ed by the Apfel­baum Foun­da­tion. The win­ner will receive 10 000 Euro.

Fur­ther infor­ma­tion regard­ing the Prize can be found here.

You can access the com­plete doc­u­ments for the award by con­tact­ing kontakt(at)srzg.de

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4) New board mem­ber at the FRFG: Bern­hard Win­kler

04_12_13_pressefoto by mathias lauringer mlfoto.eu_kleinSince Octo­ber 27th, Bern­hard Win­kler is a new mem­ber of the board of the FRFG. Win­kler is dis­plac­ing Danyal Bayaz.

Bern­hard Win­kler (born in 1989), is study­ing law at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Linz, Aus­tria. He is the author of the book “So nicht! Anklage ein­er ver­lore­nen Gen­er­a­tion” and a mem­ber of the think tank “denkt.at”, a net­work of thir­ty young Aus­tri­an thinkers.  Fur­ther­more, he worked as a jour­nal­ist in the news­pa­per Oberöster­re­ichis­chen Nachricht­en, and since 2010 he is a PR-employ­ee in a large Aus­tri­an sports arti­cle-com­pa­ny.

We are look­ing for­ward to work togeth­er with Bern­hard Win­kler and express our grat­i­tude to Danyal Bayaz  and his effort as a mem­ber of the FRFG board. How­ev­er, Bayaz will not leave the orga­ni­za­tion, as he is still going to work as an ambas­sador for the FRFG.

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5) The new ambas­sadors of the FRFG

Since Octo­ber 27th, the FRFG has six new ambas­sadors, who are going rep­re­sent the FRFG. The new ambas­sadors of the FRFG are:

anna_botschafterAnna Hal­big: Anna Hal­big (born in 1990) is study­ing law in Göt­tin­gen. As a part of her study pro­gram “Europäis­ches und inter­na­tion­als öffentlich­es Recht”, she takes par­tic­u­lar inter­est in envi­ron­men­tal law. With­in the Philip C. Jes­sup Inter­na­tion­al Law Moot Court Com­pe­ti­tion, a renowned court sim­u­la­tion, she deals with the judge­ment of cli­mate refugees. Anna Hal­big led the FRFG-del­e­ga­tion at the UN cli­mate sum­mit in Warschau in 2013.

To me, inter­gen­er­a­tional jus­tice means that we all have to strive for sus­tain­able devel­op­ment and envi­ron­men­tal pro­tec­tion. The con­se­quences of con­tem­po­rary care­less­ness are that the com­ing gen­er­a­tions will have to bare most of the costs. Thus, it is nec­es­sary to curb the neg­a­tive con­se­quences of cli­mate change effec­tive­ly.”

yvonne_botschafterYvonne Eich: Yvonne Eich (born in 1984), is work­ing as a research fel­low at the Bun­desin­sti­tut für Bevölkerungs­forschung in Wies­baden, where she is respon­si­ble for the “Online-Demografiedi­a­log” of the Fed­er­al Gov­ern­ment. Fur­ther­more, she is in charge of the Youtube-chan­nel “Demografiepor­tal” of the Ger­man Gov­ern­ment and the Fed­er­al States. Ear­li­er, she has worked as an edi­tor and blog­ger in the project futurechallanges.org led by the Ber­tels­mann Foun­da­tion. Yvonne Eich has stud­ied Busi­ness and Euro­pean Stud­ies in Ful­da, Queens­land (Aus­tralia), Han­nover and Temeswar (Roma­nia). In her mas­ter the­sis, she inves­ti­gat­ed Social Media Com­mu­ni­ca­tion in the EU.

To me, inter­gen­er­a­tional jus­tice, means equal oppor­tu­ni­ties for the youth and the elder­ly. Espe­cial­ly with­in the edu­ca­tion­al sec­tor I iden­ti­fy obsta­cles which make it dif­fi­cult to guar­an­tee every­one the same oppor­tu­ni­ties, not only between gen­er­a­tions, but also with­in one gen­er­a­tion. In my opin­ion, par­tic­u­lar­ly the tri­par­tite school sys­tem and the stig­ma­tized Hauptschu­la­b­schluss are respon­si­ble for this. In 2011, around 50 000 pupils left Ger­man high school with­out com­plet­ing or achiev­ing their diplo­mas. This num­ber presents around 6 % of one age cohort. In oth­er words, the chances of young peo­ple to cre­ate decent lives are put at stake, because many of them have to begin their adult lives with diplo­mas, which are social­ly per­ceived as insuf­fi­cient, or no diplo­ma at all. It is evi­dent that inter­gen­er­a­tional jus­tice has to start with cre­at­ing equal edu­ca­tion­al oppor­tu­ni­ties. ”

bettina_koenig_botschafterBet­ti­na König: Bet­ti­na König (born in 1978) has a diplo­ma in Busi­ness Admin­is­tra­tion and is the founder and head of board of Vere­ins fair­work e.V., which is advo­cat­ing the rights of interns since 2004. Beside orga­niz­ing strikes, speech­es and con­sul­tan­cy advices, she sub­mit­ted a peti­tion to the Bun­destag and pub­lished the book “Vom Prak­tikum zum Job”. In 2011 she stood as a can­di­date for the SPD in the con­stituen­cy of Reinick­endorf-Ost in order to enter the Abge­ord­neten­haus in Berlin (region­al par­lia­ment), where she failed to enter only by a small mar­gin.  She is still involved in the SPD, amongst oth­ers as a deputy chair­woman and a del­e­gate to the Lan­desparteitag (region­al con­gress of the par­ty). Cur­rent­ly, Bet­ti­na König is work­ing as a pub­lic rela­tions con­sul­tant for the Ger­man Red Cross and as an office man­ag­er at the SPD frac­tion office in Reinick­endorf. She has two young daugh­ters.

From my point of view, inter­gen­er­a­tional jus­tice rep­re­sents the abil­i­ty to leave behind a soci­ety which will offer young peo­ple of today as well as the forth­com­ing gen­er­a­tions the same pos­si­bil­i­ties as the pre­vi­ous gen­er­a­tions claimed for them­selves. The upcom­ing gen­er­a­tions must have the oppor­tu­ni­ty to cre­ate mean­ing­ful lives, just as those who are old nowa­days. The cur­rent gen­er­a­tions have no right to exces­sive­ly use raw mate­ri­als or to dam­age the envi­ron­ment irre­versibly, and thus let future gen­er­a­tions bare all the costs. Inter­gen­er­a­tional jus­tice is in par­tic­u­lar relat­ed to envi­ron­men­tal pro­tec­tion and the use of nat­ur­al resources. Nev­er­the­less, top­ics like the labour mar­kets, the pub­lic health care ser­vices, eco­nom­ic and fis­cal poli­cies and the over­all social polit­i­cal frame­work have to be approached in a way that is not dis­ad­van­tag­ing any gen­er­a­tion.  Espe­cial­ly regard­ing the aspects of the cur­rent demo­graph­ic changes, the ques­tion of jus­tice between gen­er­a­tions is more sig­nif­i­cant than ever before. We can­not allow peo­ple to be dis­crim­i­nat­ed against because of their age. This means that we need to encour­age politi­cians, busi­ness and oth­er impor­tant soci­etal actors to look ahead and take respon­si­ble acts to ensure that the basic needs of future gen­er­a­tions are safe­guard­ed. Espe­cial­ly our politi­cians have a huge respon­si­bil­i­ty in this regard. Unfor­tu­nate­ly, they are cur­rent­ly fail­ing to take this respon­si­bil­i­ty in many areas. Some­one has to put it back on the agen­da, this is why I would like to work as an ambas­sador for the FRFG.”

manou_botschafterManouchehr Sham­srizi:
Manouchehr Sham­srizi (born in 1988) is cur­rent­ly com­plet­ing his Mas­ter in Pub­lic Pol­i­cy at the Hum­boldt Viad­ri­na School of Gov­er­nance in Berlin. As a schol­ar­ship hold­er of the Deutsch­land­stipendi­um, he is a mem­ber of the theme group “Alter und alternde Gesellschaft” at the Hum­boldt Uni­ver­si­ty and the Scher­ing Foun­da­tion. Pre­vi­ous­ly, he stud­ied Econ­o­my-, Cul­ture-, and Polit­i­cal Sci­ence at the Zep­pelin Uni­ver­si­ty, where he also was coor­di­na­tor of the Euro­pean Cen­ter for Sus­tain­abil­i­ty Research. He is a Glob­al Jus­tice Fel­low at Yale Uni­ver­si­ty and a fel­low of the Roy­al Soci­ety of Arts. Besides, he is also a mem­ber of sev­er­al think tanks, amongst oth­ers the “beta-group” of the ZEIT Foun­da­tion, the Google Col­lab­o­ra­to­ry, the Siemens Future Influ­encers and the Grameen Cre­ative Labs “Yunus Brain­pool”. He is blog­ging at futurechallanges.org led by the Ber­tels­mann Foun­da­tion, and he is work­ing as a colum­nist in the “REVUE – Mag­a­zine for the Next Soci­ety”.

Every def­i­n­i­tion of inter­gen­er­a­tional jus­tice is locat­ed at the inter­face between right­eous gen­er­a­tions and the ideas of gen­er­a­tional jus­tice. If gen­er­a­tions are not behav­ing fair regard­ing their eth­i­cal han­dling of knowl­edge based deci­sion premis­es, it will be not pos­si­ble to observe inter­gen­er­a­tional jus­tice just as much as spheres of jus­tice which are blind for their struc­tur­al links. Gen­er­a­tions are the only actors which are able to cre­ate iden­ti­ty in these dif­fer­en­ti­at­ed-transna­tion­al soci­eties in which I can change my sur­name, reli­gion and cit­i­zen­ship with­out any dif­fi­cul­ties. How­ev­er, I will still be part of my gen­er­a­tion. In this sense inter­gen­er­a­tional jus­tice implies the recog­ni­tion of the neces­si­ty to claim for jus­tice as a whole gen­er­a­tion – fur­ther­more inter­gen­er­a­tional jus­tice means to acknowl­edge the polit­i­cal beau­ty result­ing due to a coop­er­a­tion between the gen­er­a­tions: do ut des.”

martin_botschafterMar­tin Speer: Mar­tin Speer (born in 1986) is entre­pre­neur, activist and stu­dent. He was part of the group “Stu­dents for Barack Oba­ma” and he  found­ed the bev­er­age com­pa­ny OCÓO as well as the adver­tis­ing agency “Ideen­re­pub­lik”.  He is a co-ini­tia­tor of the “Gen­er­a­tio­nen­man­i­fest” and “Zukun­ft­man­i­fest”. He also wrote the open let­ter “Stellt gle­ich, was gle­ich ist” to the Bun­destag. Ear­li­er, he stud­ied Com­mu­ni­ca­tion Sci­ence in the USA and cur­rent­ly he is study­ing Econ­o­my in Berlin.

I want to leave behind a world where upcom­ing gen­er­a­tions can cre­ate mean­ing­ful lives for them­selves. How­ev­er, inter­gen­er­a­tional jus­tice is more than just a per­son­al mat­ter for me. It is the eco­nom­ic, eco­log­ic and social require­ment for a sus­tain­able and promis­ing soci­ety. In order to achieve that, we have to start today – liv­ing, man­ag­ing economies  and gov­ern in a respon­si­ble man­ner. Togeth­er with the FRFG, I want to make sure that the chal­lenges of the future are being tak­en into account today. Inter­gen­er­a­tional jus­tice con­cerns all of us, young and old.”

danyal_kleinDanyal Bayaz: Danyal Bayaz (born in 1983) comes from Hei­del­berg and has stud­ied Polit­i­cal Com­mu­ni­ca­tion and Finance. Besides, he is a skilled jour­nal­ist, who is cur­rent­ly writ­ing his PhD at the Fac­ul­ty of Eco­nom­ics and Social Sci­ence at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Hohen­heim (Stuttgart). With­in the top­ic of inter­gen­er­a­tional jus­tice, Bayaz takes spe­cial inter­est in macro­eco­nom­ic per­spec­tives.

“From my point of view, inter­gen­er­a­tional jus­tice means that the inter­ests of the present gen­er­a­tions and the future gen­er­a­tions are bal­anced against each oth­er. Obvi­ous­ly, it is utopi­an to believe that one gen­er­a­tion is able to hand the world over to the next one in the cur­rent state, because the world is chang­ing every day. How­ev­er, we should indeed make an effort to make sure that future gen­er­a­tions at least have the same oppor­tu­ni­ties from the begin­ning, when it comes to orga­niz­ing their lives and cre­at­ing accept­able liv­ing con­di­tions. Prac­ti­cal­ly, inter­gen­er­a­tional jus­tice has two dimen­sions: The finan­cial dimen­sion is very impor­tant, espe­cial­ly regard­ing the con­sol­i­da­tion of nation­al bud­gets. The oth­er dimen­sion is an envi­ron­men­tal con­flict between the gen­er­a­tions which is empha­sized through top­ics like the han­dling of nuclear waste and car­bon diox­ide.”

Fur­ther infor­ma­tion about our new ambas­sadors can be found here.

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6) The 44th St. Gallen Sym­po­sium: “The Clash of Civ­i­liza­tions”

06_12_13_st_gallen_symposiumThe 44th St. Gallen Sym­po­sium “The Clash of Civ­i­liza­tions” will take place between 6.–9.of May 2014. More infor­ma­tion about the sym­po­sium can be found on the offi­cial web­site.

In line with the sym­po­sium a com­pe­ti­tion for aca­d­e­m­ic arti­cles was announced. The prize mon­ey will be 20 000 € (divid­ed on the three win­ners). Fur­ther infor­ma­tion regard­ing the com­pe­ti­tion can be found here.

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7) Report of the Oxford Mar­tin Com­mis­sion for Future Gen­er­a­tions

07_12_13_martin_schoolIn Octo­ber 2013, the Oxford Mar­tin Com­mis­sion pub­lished the “Now for Long Term” Report, in which they urge today’s deci­sion-mak­ers “to over­come their dai­ly press­ing pre­oc­cu­pa­tions” and “to tack­le prob­lems that will deter­mine the lives of today’s and tomorrow’s gen­er­a­tions”. There­fore, the Com­mis­sion maps the main chal­lenges that are to be faced in areas such as soci­ety, resources, health, geopol­i­tics and gov­er­nance, for instance: how can growth and devel­op­ment be more sus­tain­able and inclu­sive? How can food, ener­gy, water and bio­di­ver­si­ty be made more secure?

It then reports on suc­cess­ful as well as on failed mea­sures that were tak­en until now to respond these chal­lenges. In regard to these con­crete expe­ri­ences, the report iden­ti­fies five shap­ing fac­tors that make pos­i­tive change tricky: (1) insti­tu­tions, (2) time, (3) polit­i­cal engage­ment and pub­lic trust, (4) grow­ing com­plex­i­ty and (5) cul­tur­al bias­es. Con­sid­er­ing this dif­fi­cul­ties, it pro­pos­es 5 mea­sures to tack­le glob­al chal­lenges: (1) part­ner­ships between gov­ern­ments, firms and indi­vid­u­als in order to find cre­ative solu­tions, (2) renew­al of insti­tu­tions in order to be more adapt­ed to actu­al chal­lenges, (3) reval­u­a­tion of the future and empha­sis on long-term action, (4) giv­ing younger gen­er­a­tions the pos­si­bil­i­ty of shap­ing today tomorrow’s poli­cies, rein­force dia­logue and shared val­ues between all actors.

Key mes­sages of the report were already dis­cussed in the Unit­ed-States where its orig­i­nal­i­ty and rel­e­vance were par­tic­u­lar­ly appre­ci­at­ed. For­mer gen­er­al Direc­tor of the WTO Pas­cal Lamy as well as Nobel Lau­re­ate Amartya Sen are part of the Oxford Mar­tin Com­mis­sion.

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8) Future Gen­er­a­tions in the UN

08_12_13_unThe report from the UN Sec­re­tary-Gen­er­al, “Inter­gen­er­a­tional Sol­i­dar­i­ty and the Needs of Future Gen­er­a­tions” is out. The full report can be found here.

A high num­ber of the Major Groups and many civ­il soci­ety organ­i­sa­tions, with the sup­port of numer­ous Mem­ber States, called for the estab­lish­ment of a UN High Com­mis­sion­er for Future Gen­er­a­tions.

In the course of the Rio+20 process this pro­pos­al mor­phed into a High Lev­el Rep­re­sen­ta­tive for Sus­tain­able Devel­op­ment and Future Gen­er­a­tions. Unfor­tu­nate­ly this was dropped in the final hours of nego­ti­a­tions and instead we have been look­ing towards the report on inter­gen­er­a­tional sol­i­dar­i­ty and future gen­er­a­tions (para 86 of ‘The Future We Want’) as a key tool to ensure that inter­gen­er­a­tional equi­ty becomes an inte­gral part of UN pol­i­cy-mak­ing process­es.

Fur­ther infor­ma­tion can be found here.

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9) Impor­tant events for the FRFG

09_12_13_srzg_logoAt Novem­ber 7th 2013, the FRFG-ambas­sador Mar­tin Speer par­tic­i­pat­ed in the Maybrit Ill­ner talk with the top­ic “Koali­tion der Wohltäter – Wer bezahlt die teuren Renten-Pläne?”. The com­plete broad­cast can be seen at Youtube.

At Novem­ber 18th, the final event of the aca­d­e­m­ic year “Die demografis­che Chance” took place in the for­mer ple­nary hall of the Ger­man Par­lia­ment. Dur­ing the event, the results of the polit­i­cal sim­u­la­tion “Par­la­ment der Gen­er­a­tio­nen” were pre­sent­ed as well.

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With best regards,
The Edi­tors

Foun­da­tion for the Rights of Future Gen­er­a­tions
(Stiftung fuer die Rechte zukuen­ftiger Gen­er­a­tio­nen)
Mannsperg­er Str. 29
D-70619 Stuttgart

Tel: +49-(0) 711 – 28 05 27 77
Fax: +49-(0) 3212 – 28 05 27 7
E-Mail: kontakt(at)srzg.de
Home­page: www.intergenerationaljustice.org & www.srzg.de

Board:
Bern­hard Win­kler
Dr. Bet­ti­na Munimus
Wolf­gang Gründinger
Adri­an Schell (head of board)

Office Man­ag­er:
Igor Dim­itri­jos­ki

Copy­right © 2013 FRFG

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Newslet­ter for Inter­gen­er­a­tional Jus­tice – 03/2013
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1) LEGISLATIVE PRIZE 2013 FOR INTERGENERATIONALLY JUST LAWS

2) DEMOGRAPHY PRIZE 2012/13 ONYOUTH QUOTAS

3) INTERGENERATIONAL ARTWORK IN THE PARLIAMENT OF BADEN-WÜRTTEMBURG

4) NGO AIMS TO STOP DESERTIFICATION

5) EUROPEAN COMMISSION PROPOSES REGULATION FOR YOUTH EMPLOYMENT INITIATIVE

6) EU YOUTH CONFERENCE IN DUBLIN

7) LAST BUT NOT LEAST

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1) LEGISLATIVE PRIZE 2013 FOR INTERGENERATIONALLY JUST LAWS

201303_01_englIn addi­tion to the Inter­gen­er­a­tional Jus­tice Award and the Demog­ra­phy Prize last year the FRFG estab­lished the Leg­isla­tive Prize for Gen­er­a­tional­ly Just Laws. The Leg­isla­tive Prize will be award­ed for the first time at the end of the 2013 leg­isla­tive peri­od. The FRFG has pro­vid­ed the jury with dossiers of the rec­om­mend­ed laws and leg­isla­tive ini­tia­tives. With the help of an eval­u­a­tion sheet, the jury will eval­u­ate the rec­om­mend­ed laws and select a win­ner. In sum­mer 2013 the prize will be award­ed. The FRFG hopes to be able to con­firm the Pres­i­dent of the Ger­man Bun­destag as the prize recip­i­ent.

For fur­ther infor­ma­tion about the Leg­isla­tive Prize: www.intergenerationaljustice.org > Awards > Leg­isla­tive Prize for Gen­er­a­tional­ly Just Laws

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2) DEMOGRAPHY PRIZE 2012/13 ONYOUTH QUOTAS

201303_02_englThe dead­line for the Demog­ra­phy Prize 2013, ded­i­cat­ed to the ques­tion “Youth Quo­tas – The Answer to Changes in Age Demo­graph­ics?”, has been extend­ed until July 1, 2013. We encour­age you to make inter­est­ed peo­ple aware of the prize. Thanks to coop­er­a­tion with the Inter­gen­er­a­tional Foun­da­tion in Lon­don, the prize is also open to the Eng­lish-speak­ing world. Essays can be sub­mit­ted in either Ger­man or Eng­lish. The prizes for the com­pe­ti­tion will be award­ed at an aca­d­e­m­ic sym­po­sium on “Youth Quo­tas” on Octo­ber 26, 2013.Numerous aca­d­e­mics have accept­ed the FRFG’s invi­ta­tion to take part in the sym­po­sium. Fund­ing appli­ca­tions have been sub­mit­ted in order to secure fund­ing for the sym­po­sium.

For fur­ther infor­ma­tion about the Demog­ra­phy Prize: www.intergenerationaljustice.org > Awards > Demog­ra­phy Prize 2012/13

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3) INTERGENERATIONAL ARTWORK IN THE PARLIAMENT OF BADEN-WÜRTTEMBURG

201303_03.englIn coop­er­a­tion with the depart­ment of Inter­gen­er­a­tional­ly Just Poli­cies at the Eber­hard Karls Uni­ver­si­ty Tübin­gen, the FRFG has begun work on an inter­gen­er­a­tional art­work in the Par­lia­ment of Baden-Würt­tem­berg. The art­work will be named “Die zukün­fti­gen Baden-Würt­tem­berg­er/in­nen” – “The Future Cit­i­zens of Baden-Würt­tem­berg”. The idea is to cre­ate an art­work at the cen­ter of pow­er in the Par­lia­ment of Baden-Würt­tem­berg to remind politi­cians of their respon­si­bil­i­ty to future gen­er­a­tions. Since the cre­ation of the piece will be part of the “Art­work on Con­struc­tion” scheme, financ­ing is secured. €100.000 has been guar­enteed by t. With the ren­o­va­tion of the Par­lia­ment of Baden-Würt­tem­berg start­ing this year, it is hoped that the art­work will be fin­ished by 2014–2016. Dur­ing a meet­ing with Gui­do Wolf, Pres­i­dent of the Par­lia­ment, on Feb­ru­ary 28, 2013andduring a fur­ther such meet­ing with the art-com­mis­sion, details about the timetable of the art com­pe­ti­tion were dis­cussed. The FRFG, rep­re­sent­ed by advis­er Meis­ter-Scheufe­len, will play a deci­sive role in the jury of the com­pe­ti­tion.

Read more about the art­work project: https://www.intergenerationaljustice.org > Themes > Art­work

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4) NGO AIMS TO STOP DESERTIFICATION

20130522_dustIn March the Future For­est project starts in the Kubuchi Desert, Inner Mon­go­lia, to stop the expan­sion of the desert. Kwon Byung-Hyun, pres­i­dent of Future For­est, leads the project, which employs stu­dents from Korea, who are work as vol­un­teers. Dust storms cause sand to trav­el not only to Chi­na but also to Korea. More­over, the Kubuchi Desert expands every year because rain­fall decreas­es and because poor farm­ers cut down trees for fire­wood. Future For­est, which has its head­quar­ters in Korea and Chi­na, fights against the process of deser­ti­fi­ca­tion, which is a result of cli­mate change. The NGO con­sid­ers deser­ti­fi­ca­tion as “the most urgent threat human civ­i­liza­tion faces”. There­fore Kwon and the stu­dents plant trees and bush­es to help pre­vent it. In doing so, they try to make the plan­et a bet­ter place for future gen­er­a­tions.

Read about the project in the Kubuchi Desert: https://www.truth-out.org/opinion/item/14901-leading-climate-fight-defense-could-preserve-and-protect-rather-than-kill-and-destroy

For fur­ther infor­ma­tion about Future­For­est: https://www.futureforest.org/eng/page/main/index.asp

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5) EUROPEAN COMMISSION PROPOSES REGULATION FOR YOUTH EMPLOYMENT INITIATIVE

20130522_barossoOn Feb­ru­ary 7/8, 2013, the Euro­pean Coun­cil ini­ti­at­ed a Youth Employ­ment Ini­tia­tive (YEI) to tack­le youth unem­ploy­ment. From 2014 to 2020, about € 6bn would be pro­vid­ed. The ini­tia­tive is intend­ed to help young peo­ple who nei­ther have an appren­tice­ship, train­ing posi­tion nor employ­ment.

Above all, young peo­ple who live in regions in which the youth unem­ploy­ment rate is 25% or more in 2012 would be sup­port­ed and inte­grat­ed in the job mar­ket. In addi­tion to the Youth Employ­ment Ini­tia­tive, oth­er nation­al projects which are fund­ed by Euro­pean Social Fund (ESF) could be linked to the YEI.

A Youth Guar­an­tee would assure school leavers or those young peo­ple who lose their job an appro­pri­ate new job, train­ing posi­tion, edu­ca­tion­al place­ment or intern­ship with­in four months.

Read about the pro­pos­al for YEI: https://ec.europa.eu/social/BlobServlet?docId=9788&langId=en

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6) EU YOUTH CONFERENCE IN DUBLIN

20130522_euFrom March 11–12, 2013, the EU Youth Con­fer­ence “Social inclu­sion of young peo­ple in the EU” took place in Dublin. 150 young peo­ple and 100 Min­istry offi­cials from 27 EU Mem­ber States dis­cussed the find­ings of an EU-wide con­sul­ta­tion with 11,000 young peo­ple on the top­ic of social inclu­sion of young peo­ple. The results of this con­sul­ta­tion and the con­fer­ence show that young peo­ple con­sid­er that there is an urgent need for action on the fol­low­ing top­ics: Employ­ment; edu­ca­tion; par­tic­i­pa­tion; wel­fare; sup­port; youth organ­i­sa­tions; and qual­i­ty of youth work. The joint con­clu­sions will be pre­sent­ed for adop­tion by Frances Fitzger­ald TD, Min­is­ter of Chil­dren and Youth Affairs, to the Coun­cil of Youth Min­is­ters in Brus­sels in May.
The con­fer­ence is part of the Euro­pean Commission’s Struc­tured Dia­logue process which brings togeth­er young peo­ple and pol­i­cy-mak­ers to dis­cuss issues of youth pol­i­cy and to guar­an­tee that the opin­ion and the con­cerns of young peo­ple are tak­en into account in active pol­i­cy-mak­ing.

For fur­ther infor­ma­tion about the con­fer­ence and its con­clu­sions:
https://www.dcya.gov.ie/viewdoc.asp?fn=/eu-presidency-2013/EU-Youth-Presidency-Events.html

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With best regards,
The Edi­tors

Foun­da­tion for the Rights of Future Gen­er­a­tions
(Stiftung fuer die Rechte zukuen­ftiger Gen­er­a­tio­nen)
Mannsperg­er Str. 29
D-70619 Stuttgart

Tel: +49-(0) 711 – 28 05 27 77
Fax: +49-(0) 3212 – 28 05 27 7
E-Mail: kontakt(at)srzg.de
Home­page: www.intergenerationaljustice.org & www.srzg.de

Board:
Bern­hard Win­kler
Dr. Bet­ti­na Munimus
Wolf­gang Gründinger
Adri­an Schell (head of board)

Office Man­ag­er:
Igor Dim­itri­jos­ki

Copy­right © 2013 FRFG

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